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Transportation Industry

Trucking and Warehousing -This industry is comprised of 1.7 million wage and salary jobs and 881,000 truck drivers. Most of the work is done for small establishments of 10 employees or less.

Transportation and Warehousing


Industry description

Firms in the trucking and warehousing industry are a link to manufacturers and consumers, by picking-up, transporting and delivering various goods. Two distinct segments of this industry are local and long distance trucking. Local trucking comprise 60,000 trucking establishments, while long-distance trucking number 50,000 establishments. Other segments include large amounts of goods directly to their destination, with no stops, while other carriers load and unload at many destinations. Courier services carry 100 pound packages or less. The rest of the industry is comprised of freight transportation terminals and public warehousing and storage.

Needs and initiatives

Logistical services are improving the entire shipping industry. There is "just-in-time" shipping now to reduce inventory storage and inventory management, handling and warehousing. Competition in this industry is intense with the railroad industry. Courier and delivery services are also growing.

Interests

The work in this area provides for independence, but frequently travel occurs overnight on holidays and weekends. Often repairs are made "on the road." Heavy physical labor is often required in warehouse and freight terminals.

Transportation and Warehousing
Occupational Outlook


Greatest segment needs

Truck drivers make for 51% of employment in this industry, transporting from one location to another. Local drivers have the same routes daily and weekly. Long-distance truckers are often on the road for long stretches of time and have overnight stays. Dispatchers coordinate the movement of freight and trucks. There are mechanics for safety checks and repairs and marketing and sales workers. Positions in logistics management require graduate and undergraduate degrees. Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations require truck drivers to be at least 21 years of age and have 20/40 vision and good hearing.

Training

Many truck drivers enter the occupation by attending training schools for truck drivers. Some large trucking companies however have formal training programs. There are long-distance drivers who go into business for themselves and have a good business sense, as well as trucking experience. Managerial jobs are usually filled by persons with a bachelor's degree, in business, marketing, accounting and industrial relations.

Earnings

Earnings average about $13.62 an hour. Truck drivers who operate heavy tractor-trailers generally have higher earnings of about $14.09, then those with light delivery trucks. Truck mechanics average $12.43 and industrial trucks and tractor operators average $10.83. Top executive managers in the trucking industry and make about $24.04 per hour.

Employment Outlook

The number of wage and salary jobs in trucking is expected to grow about 11 percent from 1998 - 2008. This is compared to an overall economy average at a growth rate of 15%. Opportunities for qualified truck drivers are expected to be favorable.

Air Transportation - This industry provided 1.2 million jobs in 1998. Eighty percent of employees work in ground occupations.

Air
Transportation


Industry description

Major airlines and air taxi companies provide transportation for passengers and cargo.

Needs and initiatives

There were severe financial losses in the 1990's, but smaller regional and commuter airlines have lowered costs.

Interests

Most employees work in fairly comfortable offices, terminals and airplanes. Mechanics however work in noise, dirt and grease. Workers will experience irregular hours and schedules. Work will often be at night, weekends and holidays. Flight personnel are away from home frequently.

Greatest segment needs

There are many jobs in this industry. Aircraft mechanics may specialize in jet transports, engines, hydraulics or electrical systems. Dispatchers plan flights for airline crews and analyze weather conditions and determine fuel requirements. There are ticket and reservation agents for customer service and security representatives to screen passengers for weapons and illegal or forbidden items. Most pilots carry transport and cargo, but some apply chemicals for crops, spread seed for reforestation and test aircraft or take photographs. Helicopter pilots work with fire fighting, police work, evacuation and rescue, or construction. A flight attendants most important function is the safety of the passengers.

Air
Transportation and
Occupational
Outlook


Training

You may enter some of these jobs from high school, while others require extensive training. Mechanics and pilots both are certified by the Federal Aviation Association (FAA). Pilots also have a commercial pilot's license. Pilots receive their instruction and training in the military or flight school and many require 2 years of college. Mechanics should complete trade schooling.

Earnings

Most employees receive standard benefits of life and health insurance. Aircraft pilots and flight engineers earn about $39.32 per hour. Communications managers are at $22.40. Aircraft mechanics make $19.28 and first-line supervisors earn $16.82. Light attendants earn about $16.70 per hour and reservation and transportation ticket agents make an hourly wage of $11.12 per hour.

Employment Outlook

The outlook is projected for 18% over the next decade, which is about as fast as average with other industries. Occupational demand for pilots is extremely competitive, with few openings. Competition is also stiff for reservation and ticket agents. Opportunities for flight attendants though is good.

Telecommunications - This industry provides 1,042,000 wage and salary jobs in 1998. Most jobs are in telephone communications. Sixty percent of all workers are employed in either administrative support or precision production, craft and repair.

Tele-
communications


Industry description

Changes in technology are transforming this industry. The transmission not only of voice, but data, graphics and video is now common. High capacity transmission of information is done with fiber optic cables and networks of radio towers and satellites are rapidly expanding wireless telecommunications Although wireline communications is ever present, wireless network operate to transmit information from radio towers and then the signal connects through an antennae to a wireline network. Wireless services include beepers, pagers and satellite telephone services. Other sectors of the industry include e-mail and facsimile services.

Needs and initiatives

Government deregulation has resulted in an increase in competition. This competition from outside of the industry will increase with cable companies, public utilities and high-speed Internet access partners are entering the telecommunications market. The transmission of analog voice signals requires transmission capacity of bandwidth. Therefore new fiber optic networks need to be laid for higher speed transmission with wavelength multiplexing (WDM). These technologies transmit voice and data communications. This process will blur the lines between telecommunication providers and Internet service providers.

Interests

This industry offers steady year-round employment. Line installers and repairers will be willing to work outside and in all kinds of weather. Telecommunications equipment mechanics and installers will generally work indoors. The equipment operators work in pleasant air-conditioned surroundings.

Greatest segment needs

Line installers and repairers connect telephone central offices to customer's telephone systems. Telecommunication equipment mechanics, installers and repairers maintain an array of very complex communications equipment. Station installers and repairers work on customer's property. Then the rest of the industry is comprised of communications equipment operators, director assistance switchboard operators and customer service. The highly technical side of this industry requires the help of engineers, computer analysts and scientists. Telecommunications specialists design voice and data communications systems, helping to integrate communication equipment with computer networks.

Telecommunications Occupational
Outlook


Training

This industry provides for a great variety of skills and training. Many line installers are initially hired as helpers and ground workers before becoming line installers. Most companies prefer to hire telecommunications equipment mechanics, installers and mechanics with postsecondary training in electronics from a two or four year college. The need for these skills is great. Bachelor's degrees are usually required for entry-level jobs in electrical and electronics engineering. Computer engineers hold a degree in computer science or software engineering. Administrators often have degrees in computer science and information management.

Earnings

Earnings in this industry varies to a great degree. Communications, transportation and utility managers earn $31.13, while computer programmers earn about $23.45 and central PBX installers make $20.39. Telephone and cable repairers make about $18.87 and directory assistant operators earn about $14.48 per hour.

Employment Outlook

Employment in this industry is expected to increase 23 percent over 1998 - 2008, which is faster then the 15% projected for the rest of the economy. Some employment loss will occur with improved labor-saving technologies, such as self-monitoring equipment. Employment in directory assistance will decline with the increase in automation. Businesses will request more wireline installations to increase connections to suppliers and customers. Employment in mechanics, installation and repair is expected to increase.

Cable and Other Pay Television Services - Cable and other pay television services provided about 181,000 wage and salary jobs in 1998.

Cable and Other Pay Television
Services


Industry description

This industry provides widely used television and other services on a subscription or fee basis. Cable networks produce original studio productions. Currently two-thirds of households have pay television services.

Needs and initiatives

It used to be that this service was strictly from the cable company to the customer. New technologies are allowing though for two-way communication with telephone service and high-speed Internet access. New digital transmission creates higher resolution television.

Interests

The working conditions in this industry varies. Most professional and clerical workers are indoors. technical and craft workers perform duties in all kinds of outdoors weather.

Greatest segment needs

About one-third of this industry is in administrative support, while another third is in craft and repair which includes installers, line technicians and maintenance technicians. The rest of the occupations include such work as camera operations, producers and newscasters. Electrical and electronic engineers design wireless distribution systems, network administrators maintain computer servers. Lastly market researchers and sales representatives work to sell advertising time to sponsors.

Cable and Other Pay Occupational Outlook


Training

Many of the jobs do not require a college degree, but increasingly mechanical, mathematical and electrical postsecondary studies are necessary. A two year associates degree is recommended. There are also trade schools for cable technicians. Professional positions often require a bachelor's degree, such as broadcast journalists, engineering and computer specialists.

Earnings

Earnings for installers and repairers runs about $11.56 per hour, while sales agents make about $14.21.

Employment Outlook

Employment in this industry is expected to increase by 27% between 1998 to 2008, which is faster then the 15% projected for all industries. The high demand for high-speed Intenet access and digital television programming will increase customer subscription demand. Opportunities will be the best for those with technical skills. Cable installation jobs and customer service representatives will also be in demand. Lastly this drive for cable access will increase the demand for producers, newscasters and camera operators.

Center for Employment Services at Lansing Community College

Career and Employment Services
Continental Bldg (CB), Room 104
Phone: (517) 483-1172
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